National Adoption Month

National Adoption Month

0 November 10, 2016

November: National Adoption Month

Written by: Kimberly Treharne, LMHC
Did you know that Florida Governor Rick Scott declared November as National
Adoption Month? Last year 3,469 children found their “forever families” in Florida
alone!
Based on the numbers, there’s a good chance that someone in your family or
circle of friends has been touched by adoption. It’s important to know that there
are many reasons parents choose to adopt; including infertility, being adopted as
a child, religion/spirituality, being single, being a gay/lesbian couple, adopting
through foster care, or a combination of many factors. Some parents choose the
route of international adoption, while others adopt within their family. Some
adoptions are referred to as “open” which preserves open communication and
visits with the biological family, while other adoptions are considered “closed” and
without biological family contact. Some people are adopted at birth, while others
find their forever home just shy of their 18th birthday.
Adoption is a special way in which families are formed. While adoption is more
common than most think, adoptive children can face unique challenges
throughout their development and into adulthood including feelings of rejection or
abandonment, low self-esteem, feelings of difference or exclusion, and loss or
grief. Most adoptive people will go through a time (or many times!) of questioning
their identity and having strong desires to find their birth family.
Adoptive parents face unique challenges as well, including financial and/or legal
stress in trying to adopt, grief and loss in infertility, emotional challenges through
adjusting to parenthood, and trying to know the “best” way to support their
adoptive child.
Adoptive parents and children experience tremendous joy and love, but like
every family, need support and guidance at times.
 Get support: There are many online support groups, forums, and
communities for adoptive families.
o http://www.adoptioncouncil.org/
o https://adoption.supportgroups.com/
o http://www.adoptivefamiliescircle.com/groups/
o https://adoption.com/forums/
 Get reading: Find age-appropriate books for children so that they have the
words to tell their adoption story. For parents, know that there are
adoption books on almost any adoption-related issue.
o http://www.parents.com/parenting/adoption/facts/childrens-booksabout-
adoption/
o http://www.theadoptionmagazine.com/my-10-favorite-childrensbooks-
about-adoption-link-up/
 Get treatment: Find an adoption-competent family therapist to address the
unique challenges faced by adoptive families.November: National Adoption Month
Did you know that Florida Governor Rick Scott declared November as National
Adoption Month? Last year 3,469 children found their “forever families” in Florida
alone!
Based on the numbers, there’s a good chance that someone in your family or
circle of friends has been touched by adoption. It’s important to know that there
are many reasons parents choose to adopt; including infertility, being adopted as
a child, religion/spirituality, being single, being a gay/lesbian couple, adopting
through foster care, or a combination of many factors. Some parents choose the
route of international adoption, while others adopt within their family. Some
adoptions are referred to as “open” which preserves open communication and
visits with the biological family, while other adoptions are considered “closed” and
without biological family contact. Some people are adopted at birth, while others
find their forever home just shy of their 18th birthday.
Adoption is a special way in which families are formed. While adoption is more
common than most think, adoptive children can face unique challenges
throughout their development and into adulthood including feelings of rejection or
abandonment, low self-esteem, feelings of difference or exclusion, and loss or
grief. Most adoptive people will go through a time (or many times!) of questioning
their identity and having strong desires to find their birth family.
Adoptive parents face unique challenges as well, including financial and/or legal
stress in trying to adopt, grief and loss in infertility, emotional challenges through
adjusting to parenthood, and trying to know the “best” way to support their
adoptive child.
Adoptive parents and children experience tremendous joy and love, but like
every family, need support and guidance at times.
 Get support: There are many online support groups, forums, and
communities for adoptive families.
o http://www.adoptioncouncil.org/
o https://adoption.supportgroups.com/
o http://www.adoptivefamiliescircle.com/groups/
o https://adoption.com/forums/
 Get reading: Find age-appropriate books for children so that they have the
words to tell their adoption story. For parents, know that there are
adoption books on almost any adoption-related issue.
o http://www.parents.com/parenting/adoption/facts/childrens-booksabout-
adoption/
o http://www.theadoptionmagazine.com/my-10-favorite-childrensbooks-
about-adoption-link-up/
 Get treatment: Find an adoption-competent family therapist to address the
unique challenges faced by adoptive families.November: National Adoption Month
Did you know that Florida Governor Rick Scott declared November as National
Adoption Month? Last year 3,469 children found their “forever families” in Florida
alone!
Based on the numbers, there’s a good chance that someone in your family or
circle of friends has been touched by adoption. It’s important to know that there
are many reasons parents choose to adopt; including infertility, being adopted as
a child, religion/spirituality, being single, being a gay/lesbian couple, adopting
through foster care, or a combination of many factors. Some parents choose the
route of international adoption, while others adopt within their family. Some
adoptions are referred to as “open” which preserves open communication and
visits with the biological family, while other adoptions are considered “closed” and
without biological family contact. Some people are adopted at birth, while others
find their forever home just shy of their 18th birthday.
Adoption is a special way in which families are formed. While adoption is more
common than most think, adoptive children can face unique challenges
throughout their development and into adulthood including feelings of rejection or
abandonment, low self-esteem, feelings of difference or exclusion, and loss or
grief. Most adoptive people will go through a time (or many times!) of questioning
their identity and having strong desires to find their birth family.
Adoptive parents face unique challenges as well, including financial and/or legal
stress in trying to adopt, grief and loss in infertility, emotional challenges through
adjusting to parenthood, and trying to know the “best” way to support their
adoptive child.
Adoptive parents and children experience tremendous joy and love, but like
every family, need support and guidance at times.
 Get support: There are many online support groups, forums, and
communities for adoptive families.
o http://www.adoptioncouncil.org/
o https://adoption.supportgroups.com/
o http://www.adoptivefamiliescircle.com/groups/
o https://adoption.com/forums/
 Get reading: Find age-appropriate books for children so that they have the
words to tell their adoption story. For parents, know that there are
adoption books on almost any adoption-related issue.
o http://www.parents.com/parenting/adoption/facts/childrens-booksabout-
adoption/
o http://www.theadoptionmagazine.com/my-10-favorite-childrensbooks-
about-adoption-link-up/
 Get treatment: Find an adoption-competent family therapist to address the
unique challenges faced by adoptive families.

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